Frequently Asked Questions



About Labor Law:

What will happen if I don't comply?
You may be fined up to $17,000 for each offense per location. It is imperative that you conspicuously display posters in all locations so it is available to all employees.




How often are the posters updated?
State and federal laws are constantly changing. There is no way to predict when these changes will take place. We dedicate our time to keep up with these changes so that you don't have to.



How will I know when there are changes in the labor laws?
We notify our customers of recent changes and we will highlight recent changes on our website.


What posters am I required to have for my state?
All states require different posters. See the state selector to choose your state.




Why should I buy a state kit, All-in-1 state poster or Combined state posters?
These options provide a convenient affordable package that includes all of the posters you are required to display.




How do I know that your company is providing the correct information?
We have specialists that diligently research state and federal labor laws and we guarantee our products and service.




What is the Complete Compliance Poster Update Service?
Our team of labor law researchers stays on top of the always changing federal and state regs and we are among the first to know when posting requirements change. As an active Update Service subscriber, we'll not only notify you when you have to change your posters, we'll send them to you free of charge, Keep your service active, and you'll always be in compliance and never pay for another poster again.



If I subscribe to the update service, will I be in compliance with the most recent requirements?
We guarantee that as an active service subscriber, you'll always STAY compliant as labor laws and posting requirements change.

The Complete Compliance Update Service covers the required posters included on our Federal 6-in-1 Poster and all your required state postings. The Federal posters on our Federal 6-in-1 Poster include:

  • Fair Labor Standards Act (minimum wage) Poster

  • Family and Medical Leave (FMLA poster)

  • USERRA Notice

  • Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Poster

  • Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA) Poster

  • Polygraph Protection Poster

  • Federal posters not included on the Federal 6-in-1 poster are not covered by our Complete Compliance Update Service, since the posting requirements surrounding these notices are very industry and employer-type specific. Be sure to check out our Additional Federal Posters page to see if your industry requires additional Federal notices to be posted.

    State posting requirements vary by state. To find out which posters are required by your state, go here.



    Do I have to buy a federal and state posters to purchase the service?
    No. You can subscribe to the update service at any time, but we can only guarantee you that you will start off in compliance if you purchase a complete set of federal and state posters from us.



    What is our guarantee?
    If you purchase a complete set of federal and state posters and are an active subscriber to the update service, we guarantee that you'll receive updated posters within 120 days and stay in compliance, or we'll pay any fine you incur, up to $17,000, for not complying. This guarantee applies only to physical locations where an Active Update Service is currently on record.

    The Complete Compliance Update Service covers the required posters included on our Federal 6-in-1 Poster and all your required state postings.

    Federal posters not included on the Federal 6-in-1 poster are not covered by our Complete Compliance Update Service, since the posting requirements surrounding these notices are very industry and employer-type specific. Be sure to check out our Additional Federal Posters page to see if your industry requires additional Federal notices to be posted.


    About the Final Ruling for the NLRA and the New Posting Requirement for Employee Rights:

    About NLRA
    Effective November 14, 2011 - the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has issued the final rule that requires nearly all private-sector employers to post a notice notifying employees of their rights under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).

    The poster informs employees of their rights under the NLRA such as the right to form a union, bargain collectively, discuss terms and conditions of employment with coworkers, and the right to strike. Failure to post will be treated as an unfair labor practice.




    Does my company have to post this notice?
    The posting requirement applies to all private-sector employers that fall within the Board’s jurisdiction. This includes most private-sector employers, including labor unions, but excludes agricultural, railroad and airline employers, as well as very small businesses that conduct an insufficient volume of business to have more than a slight effect on interstate commerce.



    Where should the notice be posted?
    The notice should be posted in a conspicuous place, where other workplace notices are typically displayed. We have added the newly required poster to the Federal All-in-1 to ensure complete compliance.



    Does the new requirement include a mandate that I have a poster in another language besides English?
    Yes. The notice must be posted in English and in another language if at least 20% of employees are not proficient in English and speak the other language.



    By what date do I need to have the new poster?
    The rule goes into effect on November 14, 2011, and employers will be required to start posting the new NLRA notice on or before that date.



    Will I be fined if I do not post the required notice? How will the Board enforce this new rule?
    Failure to post the notice may be treated as an unfair labor practice under the NLRA. The NLRB investigates allegations of unfair labor practices. The NLRB does not have the authority to issue fines, but can take other remedial action. However, if an employer knowingly and willfully fails to post the notice, the failure may be considered evidence of unlawful motive in an unfair labor practice case involving other alleged violations of the NLRA.



    I do not currently have a union at my workplace; does this still apply to me?
    Yes. Because NLRA rights apply to union and non-union workplaces, all employers subject to the Board’s jurisdiction (aside from the USPS) will be required to post the notice.



    What GINA means to your organization:

    What is genetic information?
    Genetic information is information about an individual’s genetic tests or the genetic tests of the individual’s family members, and the manifestation of a disease or disorder in the individual’s family members. Genetic information also includes the request or receipt of genetic services or participation in clinical research that includes genetic services, for both the individual and the individual’s family members.



    What is the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act?
    On May 21, 2008, Former President George W. Bush signed the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) of 2008 into law. GINA includes two distinct titles. Title I addresses the use of genetic information in health insurance. Title II of GINA prohibits employers from collecting genetic information from employees, and using this information to make decisions regarding employment.



    Who must comply with Title II of GINA?
    GINA applies to private and state and local government employers with 15 or more employees. Joint labor-management training programs, employment agencies, labor unions, as well as Congress and federal executive branch agencies must also comply with GINA requirements.



    Are entities subject to Title II of GINA required to comply with the law now?
    Yes. Title II of GINA went into effect on November 21, 2009.



    What practices does GINA prohibit?
    • Discrimination based on an employer’s genetic predisposition against certain illnesses in hiring, compensation, promotions and other employment decisions.
    • The collection and disclosure of genetic information by employers.
    • Enrollment restrictions and premium adjustments based on genetic information by insurers.
    • Retaliation against individuals who exercise their rights under GINA.



    Are there any exceptions to the prohibition on use of genetic information?
    There are no exceptions to the prohibition on use of genetic information. Covered entities must not use genetic information to make any employment decisions.



    Does Title II of GINA have any impact on state or local laws addressing genetic discrimination in employment?
    Title II of GINA does not trump any state or local law that provides equal or greater protections from employment discrimination on the basis of genetic information or improper access or disclosure of genetic information.



    How to prepare for GINA
    Now that the GINA effective date of November 21, 2009 has come and gone, employers should should be taking several key action steps.

    Employers should currently be keeping employee medical information separate from their personnel files, in accordance with privacy regulations. GINA requires that employee/applicant genetic information also be maintained in a medical file and kept discretely as a confidential medical record.

    When requesting medical information, you should be sure clear guidelines are in place about the types of questions which can be asked and which are prohibited under GINA.

    Genetic discrimination should be added to the list of prohibited behaviors in the workplace. Be sure to inform all your employees (managers, supervisors, HR personnel, etc.) about GINA and your employee handbook should also be updated accordingly.

    Review all your existing forms and procedures, and update forms where necessary to ensure you are in compliance with the new GINA requirements.

    Plan to update your labor law posters in order to comply with the new law requirements.



    Which required Federal postings does Title II of GINA impact?
    The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) poster has been updated to include information regarding the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act. Employers are required to post notices explaining the Federal laws prohibiting job discrimination based on race, color, sex, national origin, religion, age, equal pay, disability and genetic information. The updates to the EEOC poster are considered mandatory.

    The Fair Labor Standards Act (minimum wage) Poster has also been updated as a result of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act. In accordance with GINA, civil money penalties for violation of minimum wage, overtime, and child labor provisions have been increased. The updated maximum penalties are included our 2009 Federal 6-in-1 poster. The updates to the FSLA poster are considered recommended.



    About the changes to FMLA - Effective January 16, 2009:

    What are the new amendments to FMLA?
    • New Leave Entitlement – Eligible employees who are a spouse, son, daughter, parent or next of kin of service members who are recovering from a serious illness or injury sustained in the line of duty on active duty, are entitled to up to 26 weeks of leave in a single 12-month period to provide care for the service member. This amendment took effect as soon as it was signed into law (1/28/08).
    • New Qualifying Reason for Leave – Eligible employees are entitled to up to 12 weeks of leave due to “any qualifying exigency” when a spouse, son, daughter, or parent of the employee is on active duty (or has been notified of an impending call to active duty status). The Secretary of Labor will issue regulations clearly defining “any qualifying exigency”; likely examples are overseas assignments, being recalled to active duty and troop mobilizations. This amendment is not effective until the Secretary of Labor issues final regulations, however, the Department of Labor (DOL) encourages employers to provide this type of leave to qualifying employees now.


    When did the amendments to FMLA become law?
    President Bush signed into law the National Defense Authorization Act for 2008 (NDAA) on January 28, 2008. Included in this act are amendments to the Family Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA) related to leave for employees with family members in the U.S. Military. On December 18, 2008, the Department of Labor (DOL) released the final version of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) poster. The final rule took effect on January 16, 2009. ALL covered employers are required to post this new workplace poster.



    What do I need to post to be in compliance?
    On December 18, 2008, the Department of Labor (DOL) released the final version of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) poster. The final rule takes effect on January 16, 2009. It updates the FMLA regulations for new military family leave entitlements (enacted on January 28, 2008) and includes revisions to the proposed rule issued in February 2008 (and published in November 2008). These are the first set of revisions to the FMLA since it was enacted in 1993 and will affect all employers who are required to adhere to FMLA guidelines. ALL covered employers are required to post this new workplace poster which was just released by the U.S. Department of Labor.



    What does this mean to me?
    • All covered employers are required to comply with these FMLA changes. A covered employer is defined as one with 50 or more employees (including part-time and employees on leave). FMLA also applies to public agencies, including state, local and federal employers, and local education agencies – regardless of employee size.
    • Employers should be aware of the new reasons for taking leave and should revise their FMLA policies and procedures.
    • State FMLA posters are not affected by this change since it is Federal law. However, states may modify their FMLA law as a result of the Federal change.
    • ALL covered employers are required to post the final FMLA poster along with other mandatory Federal posters.


    About the revised Form I-9 effective April 3, 2009:

    About the revised Form I-9 effective April 3, 2009?
    The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), a division of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), issued the new Form I-9 on which took effective April 3, 2009.



    What are the current revision dates for the 2009 Form I-9 (English and Spanish)?
    The Form I-9 (English and Spanish versions) is valid as long as it has a revision date of February 2, 2009.



    What are the current expiration dates for the 2009 Form I-9 (English and Spanish)?
    The validity of the form is based on a revision date of February 2, 2009 - and an experation date of June 30, 2009.



    What is the difference between the revised Form I-9 and the old version?
    The biggest difference in the revised Federal Form I-9 is that all documents presented during the verification process must be unexpired. The USCIS has also added two documents to List A on the List of Acceptable Documents.



    Is the Form I-9 available in different languages?
    The Form I-9 is available in English and Spanish. However, only employers in Puerto Rico my have employees complete the Spanish version for their records. Employers in the 50 states and other U.S. territories may use the Spanish version as a translation guide for Spanish-speaking employees, but must complete the English version and keep it in the employer’s records. Employees may also use or ask for a translator/preparer to assist them in completing the form. We offer a Spanish Federal I-9 Form Template as a translation guide for Spanish-speaking employees.



    Can I continue to use earlier versions of the Form I-9?
    No. Employers must use the 2009 edition of the Form I-9, revised on February 2, 2009. All previous versions of the Form I-9, in English or Spanish, are no longer valid. Employers who continue to use the outdated editions of the Form I-9 are subject to fines and penalties.



    When do I need to begin using the 2009 edition of the Form I-9?
    As of April 3, 2009, the amended Form I-9 is the only valid version of the form.



    About the 2009 increase in the Federal Minimum Wage:

    When did the Federal Minimum Wage increase become law?
    President Bush signed the first increase in the Federal Minimum Wage in ten years into law (Fair Minimum Wage Act of 2007) on Friday, May 25, 2007. It was part of a supplemental spending bill for the war in Iraq. The current Federal minimum wage stands at $7.25 per hour, which took effect July 24, 2009.



    When did the new wage take effect?
    The current minimum wage of $7.25 per hour took effect on July 24, 2009. The law called for an increase in the Federal Minimum Wage over a two year time span from $5.15 to $7.25 ($5.85 by July 24, 2007, $6.55 by July 24, 2008 and $7.25 by July 24, 2009).



    When was the minimum wage poster be issued by the Federal government?
    The Department of Labor issued the new Federal Minimum Wage poster on July 3, 2007.



    When did the poster need to be posted?
    You need to have posted the new Federal Minimum Wage poster by July 24, 2007 when the law took effect.



    What does this mean to me?
    Regardless of the size of your company, this change affected you in three main ways:
    • All non-exempt hourly workers must be paid the new minimum wage for every hour they work.
    • Non-exempt workers paid in other ways (salaried, commission-based, etc.), must be compensated such that their weekly pay divided by the total number of hours worked in the workweek yields an hourly rate of at least the new minimum wage.
    • You are REQUIRED to post notice of the new minimum wage (along with five other notices) in your workplace. Again, this is regardless of your company size. Federal law mandates that all businesses display 6 federal labor law posters (including the federal minimum wage law poster).
    • Each state has similar mandatory requirements that are not met unless state posters are displayed as well. A change in state minimum wage does not exempt an employer from posting the Federal minimum wage – even if the state wage is higher.
    • Employers and their individual managers can face legal liability and stiff fines for violating federal minimum wage laws or mandatory posting requirements.